7, 13 and 16 June 2018, 4 pm

Wagner: Tristan und Isolde

An opera in three acts

At first glance, Tristan and Isolde is a mythological story of a love triangle. However, the plot, the subject is but a framework, a coating-of-sorts for the internal storyline, the true “Handlung” as Wagner puts it. The plot itself is based on an expansive background storyline. Wagner does not use these past storyline elements as a coherent whole, but rather in fragments, by weaving them into the text in various lights, in the form of monologues and dialogues. In-depth familiarity with these is essential to understanding the psychological facts.

Tristan's relationship with the world is defined by a childhood spent in motherless orphanhood. He is as completely orphaned as Siegfried: his father having died before he was born and his mother passing when giving birth to him. Siegfried, however, grew up in nature – motherly, nurturing and free –, whereas Tristan was raised by his uncle, King Marke at the royal court. This environment is symbolised by ‘day’, i.e. male virtues such as: honour, glory and vim. Tristan is, therefore, the shining hero of the court’s ‘daylight’ world (“Ein Herr der Welt, Tristan, der Held!”: A master of the world! The hero Tristan!), the king’s victorious soldier. In the war against the Irish, he kills the enemy’s hero Morold, Isolde’s fiancé. But he is also wounded in the fight, and in Wagner’s work this wound takes on deep significance: it fails to heal and this forces Tristan to take to the sea, take on false identity and seek relief in Ireland from ‘healing Isolde’.
The journey of Tristan and Isolde: stepping out of the land of everyday actions into life that is truly human and of mythical proportions. Tristan and Isolde is a story of man becoming transcendent. Wagner sees the solution as death conceptually and the denial of will philosophically, but in reality musically death represents soaring and the birth of purity – the ushering in of a new world, where earthly forces are dissipated by the radiation of man.

Source: Erich Rappl: Wagner-operakalauz (Wagner-Opernführer)
Tibor Tallián: A hét zeneműve 1978 (Composition of the week)

Artistic director and conductor: Ádám Fischer

Featuring:
the Hungarian National Philharmonic and the Male Choir of the Hungarian National Philharmonic (choirmaster: Csaba Somos)

Set designer: Maurizio Balò
Costume designer: Marina Luxardo
Revival director: Etelka Polgár
Director: Cesare Lievi

Cast

Events - 2017

June

4

Monday

June

5

Tuesday

June

6

Wednesday

June

7

Thursday

Wagner:
Tristan und Isolde

Tickets

June

8

Friday

Wagner:
Der fliegende Holländer

Tickets

June

9

Saturday

June

10

Sunday

Wagner:
Der fliegende Holländer

Tickets

June

11

Monday

June

12

Tuesday

June

13

Wednesday

Wagner:
Tristan und Isolde

Tickets

June

14

Thursday

Wagner:
Tannhäuser

Tickets

June

15

Friday

Wagner and his Contemporaries:
Camilla Nylund song recital

Tickets

June

16

Saturday

Wagner:
Tristan und Isolde

Tickets

June

17

Sunday

Wagner:
Tannhäuser

Tickets

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