8 and 10 June 2018, 6 pm

Wagner: Der fliegende Holländer

An opera in one act

Of the literary adaptations of the Flying Dutchman, the story by Heine and Frederick Marryat’s novel are most well-known. It was, however, undoubtedly propelled to world fame by Richard Wagner's opera. One day Wagner was sailing near the Norwegian coast, when the ship he was travelling on encountered a heavy storm. Seeing the raging sea and the menacing cliffs awakened the story of the Flying Dutchman in his mind, a myth he had already heard of previously. He was so inspired by it that having arrived in Paris after his adventurous voyage, he immediately set down to write his opera.

According to the story, Daland, the Norwegian sailor encounters a storm and only narrowly avoids being shipwrecked. He finds shelter in a small bay, where soon another mysterious ship drops anchor next to his. Its captain is none other than the Flying Dutchman, cursed to endlessly roam the seas. He can only step ashore once every seven years, to try and find redemption through the true love of a woman, as this is the only thing that will lift the curse. Seeing the stranger’s treasures, without a second thought greedy Daland offers him the hand of his daughter Senta in marriage. Once the storm passes, they both sail to Daland’s village. Senta has a suitor, Erik, but the girl only dreams of the cursed sailor, of whom she has heard so much about from tales told by seamen. When he turns up in the flesh, Senta gladly vows to be faithful to him forever. The curse-stricken wanderer of the seas is also hopeful that after so many failed attempts, he will now finally find redemption. But Erik does not give up hope and begs the girl to return to him. The Dutchman sees them together, misreads the situation and immediately boards his ship. Senta is unable to catch up to him, and throws herself into the sea from a cliff, redeeming the cursed captain with her sacrifice.
The figure of the Flying Dutchman originates from Dutch mythology, and symbolises the desire for settling down and pacification amidst the storm of one’s life. The feeling embodied by the Flying Dutchman is not unique by any measure, with the figure of the wandering traveller also present in other folk mythologies. The Greeks called their kindred traveller Odysseus.

Conductor: Peter Schneider

Featuring:
Featuring: the Hungarian Radio Symphony Orchestra and Choir (choirmaster: Zoltán Pad) and the Hungarian National Choir (choirmaster: Csaba Somos)
No Comment Company

Set: Péter Horgas
Costumes: Balázs Kovalik
Artistic director: Ádám Fischer
Choreography: Dániel Ódor
Assistant to the director: Zsófia Geréb
Director: Balázs Kovalik

Cast

Quotes and critiques

Events - 2017

June

4

Monday

June

5

Tuesday

June

6

Wednesday

June

7

Thursday

Wagner:
Tristan und Isolde

Tickets

June

8

Friday

Wagner:
Der fliegende Holländer

Tickets

June

9

Saturday

June

10

Sunday

Wagner:
Der fliegende Holländer

Tickets

June

11

Monday

June

12

Tuesday

June

13

Wednesday

Wagner:
Tristan und Isolde

Tickets

June

14

Thursday

Wagner:
Tannhäuser

Tickets

June

15

Friday

Wagner and his Contemporaries:
Camilla Nylund song recital

Tickets

June

16

Saturday

Wagner:
Tristan und Isolde

Tickets

June

17

Sunday

Wagner:
Tannhäuser

Tickets

Gallery

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